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Cocaine Anonymous South Africa

Helpline:

063 268 8794


ABOUT US

WHAT IS CA

Cocaine Anonymous is a Fellowship of men and women who share their experience, strength and hope with each other that they may solve their common problem and help others recover from their addiction.

The best way to reach someone is to speak to them on a common level. The members of C.A. are all recovering addicts who maintain their individual sobriety by working with others. We come from various social, ethnic, economic and religious backgrounds, but what we have in common is addiction.

The only requirement for membership is a desire to stop using cocaine and all other mind-altering substances.

Anyone who wants to stop using cocaine and all other mind-altering substances (including alcohol and other drugs) is welcome.

There are no dues or fees for membership; we are fully self-supporting through our own contributions.

We do ask for voluntary contributions at meetings to cover expenses such as coffee, rent, literature and services to help those who are still suffering. However, newcomers need not feel obligated to contribute. We do not accept donations from organizations or individuals outside the Fellowship.

We are not allied with any sect, denomination, politics, organization or institution

n order to maintain our integrity and avoid any possible complications, we are not affiliated with any outside organization. Although C.A. is a spiritual program, we do not align ourselves with any religion. Our members are free to define their spirituality as they see fit. Our individual members may have opinions of their own, but C.A. as a whole has no opinion on outside issues. We are not affiliated with any rehabs, recovery houses or hospitals, but many do refer their patients to Cocaine Anonymous to maintain their sobriety.

Our primary purpose is to stay free from cocaine and all other mind-altering substances and to help others achieve the same freedom.

The only purpose of Cocaine Anonymous is to offer recovery to individuals who are suffering from addiction. Our experience has shown that the most effective way to attain and maintain sobriety is to work with others suffering from the same malady.

We use the Twelve-Step recovery program because it has already been proven that the Twelve-Step recovery program works.

PREAMBLE

Cocaine Anonymous is a Fellowship of men and women who share their experience, strength and hope with each other that they may solve their common problem and help others recover from their addiction. The only requirement for membership is a desire to stop using cocaine and all other mind-altering substances. There are no dues or fees for membership; we are fully Self-supporting through our own contributions. We are not allied with any sect, denomination, politics, organization, or institution. We do not wish to engage in any controversy and we neither endorse nor oppose any causes. Our primary purpose is to stay free from cocaine and all other mind-altering substances, and to help others achieve the same freedom. *

“Cocaine Anonymous is a Fellowship of, by, and for addicts seeking recovery. Friends and family of addicts should contact Co-Anon Family Groups, a Fellowship dedicated to their much different needs.”

In the spirit of Tradition Six, C.A. is not allied with any sect, denomination, politics, organization or institution.

“This site copyright © 1996 – 2017 Cocaine Anonymous World Services, Inc. “C.A.”, “Cocaine Anonymous”, “We’re here and we’re free” and the C.A. Logo are registered trademarks of Cocaine Anonymous World Services, Inc. All rights reserved.”

FIND A MEETING

Respect Yourself

7:00pm
Topic / Speaker
4, 2nd Street
Delarey
Florida
Johannesburg
Madelein
0768488239

50 Shades of Recovery

7:00pm
Topic / Speaker
Methodist Church
113 Kowie Street
Three Rivers
Vereeniging
Rikus
0

The Last Straw

7:30pm
Meditation meeting every last Monday of the month
Addiction Recovery Centre
Cnr Ewing & O'Reilly Merry streets
Rynfield
Benoni
Dani
0828508773

There is a Solution

7:30pm
Topic / Speaker
Format TBC
94 Pienaar Road
Milnerton
Cape Town
Rob
0823485563

Silver Linings

7:00pm
Topic / Speaker
4 Silver Pine Avenue
Moret
Randburg
Johannesburg
Clint
0652873975

Reliance Upon God

7:30pm
Big Book
Jesus is Light AGS Church
Cnr Amatola & Du Toitskloof
Eastvale
Springs
Petrus
0728854579

Big Book Thumpers

7:00pm
Big Book
Berario Recreation Centre
191 Dolores Street
Northcliff
Johannesburg
Mel
0749069268

Miracle of Recovery

7:30pm
Topic / Speaker
NG Church
3 Botha Street
Elsburg
Johannesburg
Conrad
0799954767

New Beginnings

7:30pm
Topic / Speaker
Gardens Presbyterian Church
Cnr Hatfield & Orange streets
Gardens
Cape Town
Duncan
0815758889

House of Mercy (H&I)

7:30pm
H&I Meeting
House of Mercy
35 Olivia Road
Eveleigh
Boksburg
Glen
0743306782

CA Fellowship Vanderbijlpark

7:00pm
Don't relapse - we can help you!
Open meeting - anyone welcome
Cnr Fitzsimmons & Watermeyer streets
Vanderbijlpark
Johannesburg
Michelle
0828539891

Hope not Dope

7:30pm
Topic / Speaker
132 Seventh Street
Cnr First Avenue
Linden
Johannesburg
Lee
0635253332

It works 'cause we work it

7:30pm
Topic / Speaker
Selcourt Methodist Church
7 Grandana Road
Selcourt
Springs
Jacky
0793742555

Hell and Back

7:30pm
Topic / Speaker
St James Presbyterian Church
129 Oxford Road
Bedford Gardens
Bedfordview
Tristan
0636679793

Oaklands Meeting

7:00pm
Topic / Speaker (open meeting)
The Foundation Clinic
41 Pretoria Street
Oaklands
Johannesburg
James
0636677597

From Darkness to Light

7:30pm
Topic / Speaker
St Peters Anglican Church
98 Queens Avenue
Brakpan Central
Brakpan
Jacky
0793742555

Lapa-side

7:00pm
Topic / Speaker
38 Malcolm Road
Blairgowrie
Randburg
Johannesburg
Kevin
0670034777

Shoe Shine

4:30pm
Topic / Speaker
YouTurn Halfway House
19 Eastwood Road
Dunkeld
Johannesburg
Tersha
0620775814

Courage to Change

6:00pm
Topic / Speaker
NG Church
8 Canadair Avenue
Impala Park
Boksburg
Bradley
0605887283

Morning Glory

10:00am
Topic / Speaker
132 Seventh Street
Cnr First Avenue
Linden
Johannesburg
Brendan
0835163398

All Stars

3:30pm
Big Book Meeting
Christian Teaching Centre
Lancaster Road
Apex
Benoni
Bradley
0605887283

OUR PROGRAM

The Twelve Steps of Cocaine Anonymous:

  1. We admitted we were powerless over cocaine and all other mind-altering substances — that our lives had become unmanageable.
  2. Came to believe that a Power greater than ourselves could restore us to sanity.
  3. Made a decision to turn our will and our lives over to the care of God as we understood Him.
  4. Made a searching and fearless moral inventory of ourselves.
  5. Admitted to God, to ourselves, and to another human being the exact nature of our wrongs.
  6. Were entirely ready to have God remove all these defects of character.
  7. Humbly asked Him to remove our shortcomings.
  8. Made a list of all persons we had harmed, and became willing to make amends to them all.
  9. Made direct amends to such people wherever possible, except when to do so would injure them or others.
  10. Continued to take personal inventory and when we were wrong promptly admitted it.
  11. Sought through prayer and meditation to improve our conscious contact with God as we understood Him, praying only for knowledge of His will for us and the power to carry that out.
  12. Having had a spiritual awakening as the result of these steps, we tried to carry this message to addicts, and to practice these principles in all our affairs.The Twelve Steps are reprinted and adapted with permission of Alcoholics Anonymous World Services, Inc. Permission to reprint and adapt the Twelve Steps of Alcoholics Anonymous does not mean that A.A. is affiliated with this program. A.A. is a program of recovery from alcoholism. Use of the Steps in connection with programs and activities which are patterned after A.A. but which address other problems does not imply otherwise. Approved Literature. Cocaine Anonymous World Services, Inc. Copyright 2003.

The Twelve Traditions of Cocaine Anonymous

  1. Our common welfare should come first; personal recovery depends upon C.A. unity.
  2. For our group purpose there is but one ultimate authority — a loving God as He may express Himself in our group conscience. Our leaders are but trusted servants; they do not govern.
  3. The only requirement for C.A. membership is a desire to stop using cocaine and all other mind-altering substances.
  4. Each group should be autonomous except in matters affecting other groups or C.A. as a whole.
  5. Each group has but one primary purpose — to carry its message to the addict who still suffers.
  6. A C.A. group ought never endorse, finance, or lend the C.A. name to any related facility or outside enterprise, lest problems of money, property and prestige divert us from our primary purpose.
  7. Every C.A. group ought to be fully self-supporting, declining outside contributions.
  8. Cocaine Anonymous should remain forever non-professional, but our service centers may employ special workers.
  9. C.A., as such, ought never be organized; but we may create service boards or committees directly responsible to those they serve.
  10. Cocaine Anonymous has no opinion on outside issues; hence the C.A. name ought never be drawn into public controversy.
  11. Our public relations policy is based on attraction rather than promotion; we need always maintain personal anonymity at the level of press, radio, television and films.
  12. Anonymity is the spiritual foundation of all our Traditions, ever reminding us to place principles before personalities.

The Twelve Traditions are reprinted and adapted with permission of Alcoholics Anonymous World Services, Inc. Permission to reprint and adapt the Twelve Traditions of Alcoholics Anonymous does not mean that A.A. is affiliated with this program. A.A. is a program of recovery from alcoholism. Use of the Traditions in connection with programs and activities which are patterned after A.A. but which address other problems does not imply otherwise. Approved Literature. Cocaine Anonymous World Services, Inc. Copyright 2003.

NEW COMERS

Who Is A Cocaine Addict?

Some of us can answer without hesitation, “I am!” Others aren’t so sure. Cocaine Anonymous believes that no one can decide for another whether he or she is addicted. One thing is sure, though; every single one of us has denied being an addict. For months, for years, we who now freely admit that we are cocaine addicts thought that we could control cocaine when in fact it was controlling us.

“I only use on weekends,” or “It hardly ever interferes with work,” or “I can quit, it’s only psychologically addicting, right?” or “I only snort, I don’t base or shoot,” or “It’s this marriage that’s messing me up.”

Many of us are still perplexed to realize how long we went on, never getting the same high we got at the beginning, yet still insisting, and believing — so distorted was our reality — that we were getting from cocaine what actually always eluded us.

We went to any lengths to get away from being ourselves. The lines got fatter; the grams went faster; the week’s stash was all used up today. We found ourselves scraping envelopes and baggies with razor blades, scratching the last flakes from the corners of brown bottles, snorting or smoking any white speck from the floor when we ran out. We, who prided ourselves on our fine-tuned state of mind! Nothing mattered more to us than the straw, the pipe, the needle. Even if it made us feel miserable, we had to have it.

Some of us mixed cocaine with alcohol or other drugs, and found temporary relief in the change, but in the end it only compounded our problems. We tried quitting by ourselves, finally, and sometimes managed to do so for periods of time. After a month we imagined we were in control. We thought our system was cleaned out and we could get the old high again, using half as much. This time, we’d be careful not to go overboard. But we only found ourselves back where we were before, and worse.

We never left the house without using first. We didn’t make love without using. We didn’t talk on the phone without coke. We couldn’t fall asleep, sometimes it seemed we couldn’t even breathe without cocaine. We tried changing jobs, apartments, cities, lovers — believing that our lives were being screwed up by circumstances, places, people. Perhaps we saw a cocaine friend die of respiratory arrest, and still we went on using! But eventually we had to face facts. We had to admit that cocaine was a serious problem in our lives, that we were addicts.

What Brought Us To Cocaine Anonymous?

Some of us hit a physical bottom. It may have been anything from a nosebleed which frightened us, to sexual impotence, to loss of sensation or temporary paralysis of a limb, to a loss of consciousness and a trip to an emergency room, to a cocaine induced stroke leaving us disabled. Maybe it was finally our gaunt reflection in the mirror.

Others of us hit an emotional or spiritual bottom. The good times were gone, the coke life was over. No matter how much we used, we nevermore achieved elation, only a temporary release from the depression of coming down, and often not even that. We suffered violent mood swings. Perhaps we awoke to our predicament after threatening or actually harming a loved one, desperately demanding imagined hidden money. We were overcome by feelings of alienation from friends, loved ones, parents, children, from society, from the sky, from everything wholesome. Even the dealer we thought was our friend turned into a stranger when we came to him without money. Perhaps we awoke in dread of the isolation we had created for ourselves, using alone, suffocated by our self-centered fear and our paranoia. We were spiritually and emotionally deadened. Perhaps we thought of suicide, or tried.

Still others of us reached a different sort of bottom, where our spending and lying lost us our jobs, credit and possessions. Some of us reached the point where we couldn’t even deal — we consumed everything we touched before we could sell it. We simply could no longer afford to use. Sometimes the law intervened.

Most of us were brought down by a medley of financial, physical, social and spiritual problems.

When we found Cocaine Anonymous, we learned that cocaine addiction is a progressive disease, chronic and potentially fatal. It fit our own experience when we heard that contrary to popular myths about cocaine, it is possibly the most addictive substance known to man. And we were relieved to be told that addiction is not simply a moral problem, that it is a true disease over which the will alone is usually powerless. All the same, each of us must take responsibility for our own recovery. There is no secret, no magic. We each have to quit and stay sober; but we don’t have to do it alone!

What Is Cocaine Anonymous?

We are a fellowship of cocaine addicts who meet together to share our experience, strength and hope for the purpose of staying sober and helping others achieve the same freedom. Everything heard at our meetings is to be treated as confidential. There are no dues or fees of any kind. To be a member, you only have to want to quit, and show up. We also exchange phone numbers, and give and seek support from one another between meetings.

We are all on equal footing here. There are no professional therapists offering treatment, and no one “runs” the group. Everyone in these rooms is here because he or she has a desire to stop using cocaine. We are men and women of all ages, races, and social backgrounds, with a common bond of affliction. Our program, called the Twelve Steps of Recovery, is gratefully borrowed from Alcoholics Anonymous, whose more than 60 years of experience with substance abuse teaches us that the best human help an addict can receive is from another addict. Some of us may first come to C.A. while in a treatment program or seeking individual psychotherapy. We say, “Fine, do whatever works for you.” We don’t pretend to have all the answers. But experience teaches that a recovering addict will almost certainly relapse without the ongoing support of fellow addicts.

We welcome newcomers to C.A. with more genuine warmth and acceptance in our hearts than you can probably now imagine. For you are the life blood of our program. In great part it is by carrying the message of recovery to others like ourselves that we keep our own sobriety. We are all helping ourselves by helping each other.

What Is The First Thing?

To the newcomer who wonders what the first thing he or she must do to achieve sobriety, we say that you have already done the first thing; you have admitted to yourself, and now to others, that you need help by the very act of coming to a meeting or seeking information about the C.A. program.

You are also, at this very moment doing the next thing to stay straight; you are not taking the next hit. Ours is a one-day-at-a-time program. We suggest that you should not dwell on wanting to stay sober for the rest of your life, or the year, or even the week. Once you have decided you want to quit, let tomorrow take care of itself. Just for today, you don’t have to use. But sometimes it is too much for us to project even one whole day drug free. That’s okay. Just for the next ten minutes, you don’t have to use. It’s okay to want it, but you don’t have to use it, just for ten minutes. After ten minutes, see where you are. You can repeat this simple process as often as necessary, using whatever span of time feels comfortable. JUST FOR TODAY, I DON’T HAVE TO USE!

In the C.A. fellowship, you are among recovering cocaine abusers who are living without drugs. Make use of us! Take phone numbers. Between meetings you may not be able to avoid contact with drugs and druggies. Some of us had no sober friends at all when we first came in. You have sober friends now! When you begin to feel squirrelly, don’t wait, give one of us a call. And don’t be surprised if one of us calls you when we need help.

It may surprise you that we discourage any use of mind-altering substances, including alcohol and marijuana . It is the common experience of addicts in this and other programs that any drug use leads to relapse or substitute addiction. If you’re addicted to another substance, you’d better take care of it. If you’re not, then you don’t need it, so why mess with it. We urge you to heed this sound advice drawn from the bitter experience of other addicts. Is it likely you’re different?

We thought we were happiest with our cocaine! But we were not. In C.A. we learn to live a new way of life. We say that it is a spiritual but not a religious program — our spiritual values are accessible to the atheist as well as to the devout theist.

We who are grateful recovering cocaine addicts ask you to listen closely to our stories. That is the main thing: Listen! We know where you’re coming from, because we’ve been there ourselves. Yet we are now living drug-free, and not only that but living happily; many of us happier than we have been before. Few of us would trade all our years of addiction for the last six months or year of living the C.A. program of sobriety.

No one says that it is easy to arrest addiction. We had to give up old ways of thinking and behaving. We had to be willing to change. But we are doing it, gratefully, one day at a time.

Updated: 9 April 2013

In the spirit of Tradition Six, C.A. is not allied with any sect, denomination, politics, organization or institution.

“This site copyright © 1996 – 2017 Cocaine Anonymous World Services, Inc. “C.A.”, “Cocaine Anonymous”, “We’re here and we’re free” and the C.A. Logo are registered trademarks of Cocaine Anonymous World Services, Inc. All rights reserved.”

RECOVERY

WE CAN RECOVER

Welcome to Cocaine Anonymous.

We are all here for the same reason—our inability to stop using cocaine and all other mind-altering substances. The first step towards solving any problem is admitting that there is a problem.

The problem, as we see it, consists of an obsession of the mind and an allergy of the body. The obsession is a continued and irresistible thought of cocaine and the next high. The allergy creates an absolute inability to stop using once we begin.

We wish to assure you that there is a solution and that recovery is possible. It begins with abstinence and continues with practicing the Twelve Steps of recovery, one day at a time. Our program, the Twelve Steps of Cocaine Anonymous, is the means by which we move from the problem of drug addiction to the solution of recovery.

  1. We admitted we were powerless over cocaine and all other mind-altering substances—that our lives had become unmanageable.
  2. Came to believe that a Power greater than ourselves could restore us to sanity.
  3. Made a decision to turn our will and our lives over to the care of God as we understood Him.
  4. Made a searching and fearless moral inventory of ourselves.
  5. Admitted to God, to ourselves, and to another human being the exact nature of our wrongs.
  6. Were entirely ready to have God remove all these defects of character.
  7. Humbly asked Him to remove our shortcomings.
  8. Made a list of all persons we had harmed, and became willing to make amends to them all.
  9. Made direct amends to such people wherever possible, except when to do so would injure them or others.
  10. Continued to take personal inventory and when we were wrong promptly admitted it.
  11. Sought through prayer and meditation to improve our conscious contact with God as we understood Him, praying only for knowledge of His will for us and the power to carry that out.
  12. Having had a spiritual awakening as the result of these Steps, we tried to carry this message to addicts, and to practice these principles in all our affairs.*

Cocaine Anonymous is a spiritual program, not a religious one. In C.A. we believe each individual can choose a Higher Power of his or her own. In short, a God of his or her own understanding.

No one comes into Cocaine Anonymous to find God. We came into these rooms to get rid of a terrifying drug habit. Look around this room. You are surrounded by people who came as a last resort. We came into these rooms emotionally, financially and spiritually bankrupt. We have experienced all sorts of tragedies as a result of cocaine, drugs and/or alcohol. We have lived many of the same horrors you have, yet today we are free from the misery, terror and pain of addiction.

Maybe some of us were worse off than you; maybe some of us didn’t hit as low a bottom as you. Still the fact remains that those of us who are recovering have come to believe that a Higher Power of our own understanding can restore us to sanity.

There is a solution; we can recover from addiction. One day at a time, it is possible to live a life filled with hope, faith and courage.

“Cocaine Anonymous is a Fellowship of, by, and for addicts seeking recovery.Friends and family of addicts should contact Co-Anon Family Groups, a Fellowship dedicated to their much different needs.

START A MEETING

Yes, You Can Start a C.A. Meeting

“Life will take on new meaning. To watch people recover, to see them help others, to watch loneliness vanish, to see a fellowship grow up about you, to have a host of friends—this is an experience you must not miss. We know you will not want to miss it. Frequent contact with newcomers and with each other is the bright spot of our lives.”*

Desire & Willingness

Have you ever thought about how a C.A. meeting gets started? Your hometown may have several C.A. meetings or perhaps only a few. They usually began out of a need to carry the message of recovery to others. In every case, someone made a decision to help Cocaine Anonymous grow by starting a meeting. It was often scheduled for a day or time when there was no other meeting available. People needed a place to go to share their experience, strength, and hope with others in recovery—others who had “been there” and who could understand. Someone found an available location and arranged to pay rent. Cocaine Anonymous World Services or the local Fellowship of C.A. was notified and a Starter Kit was provided. Or perhaps a local meeting donated chips and literature to help the new meeting get going. Someone made flyers and phone calls to get the word out that there was a new C.A. meeting starting. Meeting formats were printed and speakers were scheduled. Eventually, the group held its first business meeting, a name was chosen for the group, and trusted servants were elected.

You can start a C.A. meeting, too. You already have the necessary tools. It takes willingness, commitment, and one or two people with a desire to stay sober and help others do the same. It doesn’t matter if the meeting is large or small. We are told that we “can’t keep what we have unless we give it away.”

Starting a meeting can be accomplished by simply making a few telephone calls, showing up to open the door, and making a pot of tea or coffee.

You can start a C.A. meeting, too. You already have the necessary tools. It takes willingness, commitment, and one or two people with a desire to stay sober and help others do the same. It doesn’t matter if the meeting is large or small. We are told that we “can’t keep what we have unless we give it away.”

Starting a meeting can be accomplished by simply making a few telephone calls, showing up to open the door, and making a pot of tea or coffee.

Get the Word Out

Once the location, day, and time for the new meeting have been established, the next task is to get the word out. If there is a local C.A. Fellowship, contact them to get the new meeting put into the directory and/or onto the Area website. Announce the newly scheduled meeting in other C.A. meetings and let it be known you’ll share details afterward with anyone needing directions, rides, or additional information. Flyers with all the pertinent details can be especially helpful. Let people know that the new meeting is for newcomers and old-timers alike and that support would be appreciated.

Preparation

If there are no other C.A. meetings nearby, you can obtain a Starter Kit from the Cocaine Anonymous World Service Office via the contact information on the front of this pamphlet. Starter Kits include literature, chips, and a suggested meeting format with optional readings. Meeting formats can also be downloaded here.

Remember

  • Bring desire & willingness;
  • Contact your local C.A. Fellowship and/or C.A. World Services;
  • Review the definition of a “Group” in the C.A. World Service Manual;
  • Get chips and literature;
  • Choose a meeting format;
  • Set the day and time;
  • Find and rent a location;
  • Create flyers;
  • Get the word out;
  • Get a coffee maker or teapot;
  • Get a basket for the 7th Tradition;
  • Keep coming back.

Finally

Tradition Five of Cocaine Anonymous tells us that our primary purpose is to carry the message of recovery to other addicts. Helping others and being of maximum service is our goal; it is the foundation of our recovery. Starting a meeting not only contributes to the growth of Cocaine Anonymous, it enhances your own recovery. The effort involved in starting a C.A. meeting is minimal, but the rewards are infinite.

*This excerpt from Alcoholics Anonymous, page 89, is reprinted with permission of Alcoholics Anonymous World Services, Inc. (“AAWS”).to reprint this excerpt does not mean that AAWS has reviewed or approved the contents of this publication, or that AAWS necessarily agrees with the views expressed herein. A.A. is a program of recovery from alcoholism only—use of this excerpt in connection with programs and activities which are patterned after A.A., but which address other problems, or in any other non-A.A. context, does not imply otherwise.

“Cocaine Anonymous is a Fellowship of, by, and for addicts seeking recovery.Friends and family of addicts should contact Co-Anon Family Groups, a Fellowship dedicated to their much different needs.”

CA meeting_formats download file_download

CONTACT US














Helpline

: 063 268 8794